New Tax Year 2022-23: How it Affects your Personal Finances
 
The new tax year starts on 6 April with a number of tax changes that will affect personal finances. As the 2021-22 tax year draws to a close, here are the 10 key changes to be aware of and make note of for the 2022-23 Financial Year

1. State Pension 

The state pension will increase by 3.1% in April 2022, albeit against a backdrop of rising costs - some argue this will cancel out any real gains. 
state pension will increase by 3.1% in April 2022, albeit against a backdrop of rising costs - some argue this will cancel out any real gains.

2. Minimum Wage Increase 

Minimum wage increase: the National Living Wage (NLW) will rise to £9.50 from 1 April 2022. This represents an increase of 59 pence an hour or 6.6%.  
 

3. National Insurance 1.25% Rise 

The National Insurance 1.25% rise: In the spring statement, the Chancellor confirmed these rises would go ahead. However, responding to concerns over the cost of living crisis, he announced that the income threshold at which you start to pay national insurance will rise to £12,570 from 6 July 2022
In the spring statement, the Chancellor confirmed these rises would go ahead. However, responding to concerns over the cost of living crisis

4. Dividend Tax Increases 

Dividend tax increases: similar to the National Insurance rate rises, those who earn money from dividends will also see a 1.25% rise from April 2022

5. Income Tax Threshold Freeze 

In the Spring Statement 2021, the Chancellor announced that the personal allowance and the higher rate threshold would be frozen for the four-year period 2022-23 to 2025-26. This measure was forecast to raise £1.56bn in 2022/23, rising to £8.18bn in 2025-26 
n the Spring Statement 2021, the Chancellor announced that the personal allowance and the higher rate threshold would be frozen for the four-year period

6. Pension Lifetime Allowance  

The Pension lifetime allowance continues to be frozen: this means that more people could face a tax charge when they retire. 

7. Plastic Packaging Tax 

The new tax will be introduced from 1 April 2022, aimed at reducing single use plastic and encouraging the use of recycled plastic. In effect, it is an environmental tax that aims to change behaviour and increase recycling. Manufacturers or importers of plastic packaging that have manufactured or imported more than 10 tonnes in any 12-month period or less as at 1 April 2022, or who plan to do so in the next 30 days alone from that date, must register for plastic packaging tax from 1 April 2022
aimed at reducing single use plastic and encouraging the use of recycled plastic.
it is an environmental tax that aims to change behaviour and increase recycling.

8. Residential Property Developer Tax 

This measure will introduce a new 4% tax which will apply to the largest residential property developers on the profits they make on UK residential property development. 
introduce a new 4% tax which will apply to the largest residential property developers on the profits they make on UK residential property development.

9. Inheritance Tax Reporting Change 

This is a rule change that has already come into force – but only at the start of this year. For anyone who dies on or after 1 January 2022, there are new rules about whether or not their estate can be classed as an ‘excepted estate’ - this classification may not require heirs to report the estate’s value (as long as there is no inheritance tax to pay). 
For anyone who dies on or after 1 January 2022, there are new rules about whether or not their estate can be classed as an ‘excepted estate’

10. Making Tax Digital for VAT 

All VAT-registered businesses must sign up for Making Tax Digital for VAT before 1 April 2022. 
There are a number of changes on the horizon that could have a big impact on your personal finances. This is particularly important this year given spiralling costs and rising inflation. Our top advice would be to ensure you are up to speed with potential changes and how they will impact you. 
 
As the tax year ends, you should be notified by HMRC if you need to file a return for the last 12 months. 
 
You must submit a tax return if you have self-employed earnings or have received untaxed income over £1,000. You will also have to file a tax return if you have generated income from renting out a property, including through AirBnB. 
 
You have plenty of time - the deadline for submitting a paper return is 31 October, and you have even longer if you’re filing online (31 January 2023). However, it’s always advised to start early - it can take a while to gather all the necessary paperwork.’ 
Published by Callum Williams - Business Administrator 
Sources - Credit goes to Sara White from Croner-I - Acountancy Daily 

Call your friendly Farnborough Accountant today 

We are Specialist Accountants serving plumbers, builders, electricians and all other trades, providing business advice, compliance, bookkeeping, CIS, tax returns, payroll, VAT, management accounts and cash flow forecasting 
Or call us here on 01252 856 150 

Book a half an hour discovery meeting with us - find out how we can help your business 

Share this post:

Leave a comment: 

Tags

Our site uses cookies. For more information, see our cookie policy. Accept cookies and close
Reject cookies Manage settings